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Q5 55 tfsi e Competition, all boxes ticked, Navarra Blue
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I got my new Q5 hybrid at the beginning of August 2022 when it was fairly warm. When I was in EV mode there was a kick when accelerating hard. Now it is cold I am losing range, about 20%, but the kick has gone. I have only had the drive select in 'auto' mode. The charge time for an empty battery has always been about 2 hours on a 7KW home charger. I just wonder if I have a battery cell fault but there are no error conditions.
 

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Whatcar tests in November showed around 15-20% drop in EV range with cold conditions - so your experience looks broadly in-line with their findings.
If you continue to be concerned I'm sure the dealer can check for you given that the vehicle is relatively new.

i think their test used ‘chilly’ ambient temps of 3-6 centigrade overnight - so the drop will likely be more with significantly lower temperatures.
 

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2021 Audi Q5 S line 50 tfsie with Comfort & Sound pack and Panoramic Sunroof
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I have experienced similar reduction in mileage from the battery in cold conditions. In the warm weather I was achieving 33-38 miles on a full charge whereas now I’m averaging 25-28. I have a friend who has a fully electric car and she is experiencing a similar issue which has nearly caught her iut on a couple of occasions. Hopefully it will improve once the warmer weather kicks in again.

As regards the loss of “kick”, with my lower powered 50 tfsie engine, the impact is perhaps not so noticeable but yes on a few really cold mornings I have sensed that that instant urge was just not there when I floored the accelerator. I assume that either the electronics are having to restrict power to protect the battery or the battery itself is simply not as efficient in cold weather. Not sure how that would work in colder countries though?
 

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And in a few years time...
I am looking forward to seeing how this technology is still working.
I‘m not a card-holding member of the EV fan club, but the Prius and Leaf have been around for around 25 and 12 Years respectively so I think is fair to say the current crop of electric vehicles will have a reasonable degree of longevity.

Of course, the support services associated with them will need to grow proportionally to keep them running well, but that is more of a market-opportunity than a clear barrier.

Personally, I’m more interested to see whether there is a softening of the ‘No ICE consumer vehicles after 2030’ position in many countries as the milestone date approaches.
 
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