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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have just traded my 59 plate Q5 for a new 2017 one. My 59 ran 18 inch 235/60 Bridgestone Dueller. The new one has 19 inch 235/55 Michelin Latitude Sport. I am very surprised at the much increased tyre noise on the new model, noticeable after immediately swapping cars. It sounds like the brake pads rubbing and initially I also thought it could be a noisy transmission. However it is neither as I ocassionaly hit a smooth patch of quiet road tarmac it almost vanishes. But 90% of the road tarmac is of the noisier type.

My question is what type of tyres do any others have on their new 2017 Q5 and do they notice any noise. Its hard to believe that moving from 18 inch to 19 inch would make such a difference or is it Michelin's are noisy.

My 8 Year's ownership provided a very reliable car to 80000 miles with a depreciation of only £2.5K per annum.
 

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Hi melltt-- I also found my tyres were noisy on delivery of my s-line which has the standard 19s. But I found the noise gets lower as the tyres lose the square edges of the tread pattern and become more rounded as the miles increase. I have 1800 mls on the clock and I tend not to notice the issue now. I think the cabin is so quiet that it highlights noises which were classed as 'normal' in other cars. As you say, the noise changes due to changing road surfaces but stick with it, the noise should start to lower as time goes on. Cheers
 

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Mine noisy too (depending on tarmac). Done 2500 miles and same. On 18 inch. Noticibly noisier than my previous qashqai. Carwow on YouTube talks about this as justanhonestman reported. Not sure if S line is more quieter as rear windows are better insulated.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi melltt-- I also found my tyres were noisy on delivery of my s-line which has the standard 19s. But I found the noise gets lower as the tyres lose the square edges of the tread pattern and become more rounded as the miles increase. I have 1800 mls on the clock and I tend not to notice the issue now. I think the cabin is so quiet that it highlights noises which were classed as 'normal' in other cars. As you say, the noise changes due to changing road surfaces but stick with it, the noise should start to lower as time goes on. Cheers
Are these the Michelin tyres?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Mine noisy too (depending on tarmac). Done 2500 miles and same. On 18 inch. Noticibly noisier than my previous qashqai. Carwow on YouTube talks about this as justanhonestman reported. Not sure if S line is more quieter as rear windows are better insulated.
Are these the Michelin tyres?
 

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Yes.
 

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Picked up my new Q5 this week, with Michelin tyres. Bad road noise from the rear, almost a droning sound above 20mph, even on smooth tarmac. It almost seems like a worn bearing noise, but I think it’s the tyres. Will probably go back to the dealer next week and see what they say.
 

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If the sound insulation felt behind the rear panels is fitted as badly as the felt within my two opening fuse holder compartments in the boot when new. It's no wonder noise is intruding into the cabin. I always have my parcel shelf extended which helps muffle any sounds from the rear. Yet another issue letting this car down. I may be looking at fitting my own sound insulation in the boot and sides area. Shouldn't really have to do this though.
 

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Michelin are 2 dB more than other tyres. Previously had desert duellers with minimal tyre noise on qashqai.
 
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If the sound insulation felt behind the rear panels is fitted as badly as the felt within my two opening fuse holder compartments in the boot when new. It's no wonder noise is intruding into the cabin. I always have my parcel shelf extended which helps muffle any sounds from the rear. Yet another issue letting this car down. I may be looking at fitting my own sound insulation in the boot and sides area. Shouldn't really have to do this though.
Thanks for the advice, I'm planning to glue the insulation in place today, and will try driving with the parcel shelf extended as you suggest. Not a bad idea to fit extra insulation either.
 

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Hi Rexus I think also it's a trait of SUV's. With all that open space behind the rear seats, it's gonna amplify and echo any noise produced in that area. I'm now on the lookout for decent sound deadening material. My first experiment will be to fold the rear seats down and cover the whole area with a king size duvet to see how much quieter it becomes. I know- you're probably saying he needs to get out more lol but I like a challenge.Cheers.
 

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I would be interested to hear how that duvet test pans out, it sounds like a sensible approach to see what improvement additional sound proofing might make.

I didn't notice the road noise on 2 test drives in a Q5 in June with 19 inch tyres, mine are 18 inch Michelin. I called my dealer to ask if he knew what tyres the demonstrator I drove had, but that car has now been replaced so he didn't know.
The noise I heard when first driving home from the dealer has I think improved, not as droning or as loud as it was, but still there. The tyres have only done around 100 miles so perhaps they may improve again with mileage.
I have taken your suggestions and glued down the loose sound proofing in the rear compartments and ensured that the parcel shelf is extended, which it originally wasn't and those measures have again reduced the noise, but it's still there and a bit intrusive so I'm going to persevere and see if I can reduce it further.
 

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Hi guys- as the clocks went back an hour last night, I thought I'd make use of that extra hour. Downloaded an app to my phone which measures sound and went out in my car with my duvet to do a noise test within the car with the duvet acting as the noise insulator.
I used the same stretch of road for all the tests which consisted of a stretch with a 40 mph limit and then I could increase my speed after that.
First run was the car as normal and the rear shelf retracted and no duvet. Second run was with the duvet covering the whole boot floor and extending up the sides to just under the air vent level. Third test was all the rear seats folded down with no duvet. The fourth was all rear seats folded down with the duvet covering the whole area up to the rear of the front seats, and again extending up the sides with special emphasis on making sure the rear wheel arch area was covered. See what you make of the tests.

First run with seats as normal- rear shelf retracted- 40mph read average 96 db
No duvet. 50mph read average 100db
60mph read average 98db

Second run with seats as normal- rear shelf retracted. 40mph read average 88db
Duvet covering boot floor and extending up sides. 50mph read average 90db
60mph read average 92db

Third run with all rear seats flat - no duvet. 40mph read average 98db
50mph read average 100db
60mph read average 102 mph

Fourth run with all seats flat and duvet covering 40mph read average 80db
whole boot floor area up to rear of front seats and. 50mph read average 82db
Extended up the sides covering wheel arches area. 60mph read average 84db

So driving with the rear seats raised or flat does not make much difference to the noise levels within the car at head level.
Covering the boot floor with rear seats raised reduced the levels by 6-10 db's
The biggest result was when folding the rear seats flat and covering the whole area with the duvet. A drop of between 14-18db's !!!
When I layed the duvet to cover the whole rear floor area, I extended the duvet up the sides approximately 18 inches all the way each side from the rear and up the sides of both rear passenger doors to arm rest level and pushed against the rear of the front seats. It effectively 'sealed off' the lower rear floor area and part sides (especially rear wheel arches).
When driving you could really notice the difference during the fourth test, but made the front wheel noise more noticeable as the noise coming from the rear had diminished. Also the measurements taken with my phone were taken with the phone being held at head height between the front headrest by my wife - bless her. She had to get out of bed as I had stole the duvet lol.
The readings may not be too accurate as another app I downloaded showed a difference of 15db's below all of my first readings. But it does show that if some sort of sound proofing is applied to the correct areas, then a significant drop in noise levels could be achieved. I am going to pay more attention to the wheel arch areas in further tests and the area where the subwoofer sits. It may be difficult to test the front area in the same way, but it would be interesting to see how the levels dropped with all arches covered.
If any of you guys can get access to a proper sound measuring device then give it a go and share the results. Make sure nobodys still in bed when you take the duvet lol.
Note--no duvets were harmed or destroyed in these experiments but were not done with the full consent of the duvet owner. Compensation consisting of a lunch and wine were all that was required to get back into the owners good books lol Cheers
 

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Hi guys- the readings were written in lines for easy comparison , but the posting process seems to have joined lines together. I hope it still makes sense.
 

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Those figures seem awfully high - well into noise induced hearing loss territory (sorry but I work in H&S and do quite a few noise assessments
) ....................
 

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Hi MrH I thought they were pretty high when I first seen the figures. I used to work in engineering and manufacturing and is the limit not around 90 db's before hearing protectors are used ?. As I said it was an app downloaded to my phone and the other app I downloaded was showing 15 db's less than the other. This would have taken the first few readings down to around low 80's with the best result being around 65 to 70 db's. It was just a bit of fun to pass the time and until somebody checks with a dedicated sound measuring unit, we will not have totally accurate figures. But what it did show is that if the wheel arches are covered and the rear doors had internal insulation along with the floor, it would certainly kill some of that road noise. It seems another issue has been ignored by Audi technical during their research, development and testing process. Cheers
 

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There is a site called 'auto-decibel-db' which lists cabin noise levels for a huge range of cars. They have the 2014 Q5 2.0 petrol coming in at 57db's at 55mph and 60db's at 60mph. As the new model has much more road noise than the last one and is built with lighter materials, It would be interesting to see what readings they get testing the new model. Of course, different road surfaces produce different noise levels, but the noise in the new model can be quite -- tiresome. I also have the pano roof which will not help to keep the sound down.
Update-- Car and Driver website report a level of 67db's at 70mph with a solid roof during their review of the new Q5.
 

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Justanhonestman - wow, you've certainly got some interesting results.
Took my Q5 on a 100 mile run today. I'm trying to accept the road noise as normal, but I can't. It's almost like there is an additional noise, over and above regular tyre noise, that is present at anything over 20 mph. It also appears to be coming from the rear passenger side, but that could of course be deceptive. I can honestly say I've never experienced such noise in any car I've driven, and it certainly wasn't there when I test drove the demonstrator last June.
I think the first thing to understand is whether there is a significant difference between tyre models and wheel sizes, so perhaps forum member could say what tyre size and make/model their Q5 has and if they consider their car to be road noisy.
So, I have a TFSI with 18inch, Michelin Lattitude Sport tyres and the car has a lot of intrusive road noise.
The demonstrator had 19inch tyres, tyre brand unknown and the car is no longer at the dealer to find out, and road noise was minimal.

I'll be returning to the dealer this week and will ask to drive their current demonstrator, and will report back here.

Any further results would be very welcome.
 

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Hi Rexus I have the same tyres but on 19s on my TFSI. Until I can get hold of a proper sound measuring device I cannot be sure of true readings. All I know is that the noise is louder than any car I have been in. The cabin is quiet and a conversation can be had with rear passengers without raising your voice. But the constant rushing air type of noise from the tyres seems to overpower the cabin. Is the drivetrain adding to the mix ? Who knows, but we will stick with the tyres for now. Cheers
 
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